Make Your Data Insights Visually Consumable

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Earlier this year, my company worked with the executive team at a major health care provider to reimagine the way it delivered its story to new audiences.

The CEO of this company was a real numbers guy — and rightfully so. The numbers clearly proved that his company was the right choice for patients, providers, and the health care system at large.

He understood the value of this data set and saw how it could persuade his audience. He had an entire research team dedicated to gathering data and readying new materials in advance of any meeting with a prospective partner.

But the slides in his slide deck — chock-full of charts and tables — weren’t working. They failed to present the data’s story in a way that audiences could easily, instantly understand. (See “Without Annotation, Charts Are Missed Opportunities.”) The research team was exhausted from re-creating the same types of ineffective slides over and over again.

On first glance, these graphs aren’t terrible. Most presentation software today plots clean, simple charts.

What the software doesn’t automatically do is annotate those charts well.

Here’s the problem: When faced with a slide that presents a lot of new information, our brains instantaneously assess how much effort we’ll have to exert to make sense of it. Does the slide have too much information or look difficult to process? If it does, we disengage. This is because of perceived cognitive load, or the amount of mental effort we believe is required for us to learn new information.

By overlaying visual annotations on charts and graphs, you feed your audience members insights they can understand at a glance — and that’s invaluable. Visual annotations guide viewers’ eyes straight to the point instead of making them seek it out, either amplifying a single piece of data or illustrating the relationships among several data points.

These simple, subtle additions lessen the load for the audience. By steering your audience members toward the key insights, you invite them into the story your data can tell.

Visual Annotations Prioritize What’s Important

You don’t have to be a professional designer or a data visualization wizard to master the magic of annotating insights. Instead, you just have to add simple visual elements as a supplementary layer — like an overlay on a physical chart — to explain the most pertinent details in an elegant way.

I’ll let you in on a few favorite tricks.

First, you want to make sure you choose the right type of chart. As I wrote in an earlier column, complex charts are good for exploring data, but classic charts (that is, a bar chart, line chart, and pie chart) are better for communicating data.

Second, to decide the best way to annotate your chart or graph, you’ll need to identify the main insight you want your audience to instantly take away.

Here are five specific annotation strategies you can use:

1. Highlight data.

One way to amplify data, or draw attention to a single data point, is to highlight a piece of it. An easy way to do this is to put that piece of data in a contrasting color.

In the example here (which we’ve anonymized to protect client data), the color blue is used to create emphasis. You’ll want to keep all the other elements in neutral shades so they fade into the background. With a single color, you can draw the eye to one point on the slide instantly. (See additional examples, plus before-and-after makeovers, in “Five Annotation Strategies That Will Make Your Charts Stand Out.”)

2. Label data.

If you want to make sure a specific number isn’t overlooked, make it huge. Use a graphical element such as a bubble or large type to mark your most important data. This will ensure that the viewer doesn’t miss your point.

Other times, you might not want to emphasize a single data point but instead want the viewer to make connections among several points. In these cases, visual annotations that spell out the math you want to highlight will make it easy for an audience to understand the story the data is telling.

3. Bracket data.

When you overlay a bracket onto a chart, you visually connect two or more data points; then you can add them together, subtract to calculate the difference, or calculate an average. In the case of a pie chart, a bracket can be used to add pie segments together. As with labeling data, the point is to do the math you want to highlight. Support your audience members by doing the work for them.

4. Delineate data.

Overlaying a benchmark or goal line onto a chart — a horizontal line that shows some data below it and some data above it — can draw attention to where the data shows underperformance and overperformance. You can add in numerical details to show precisely how much above or below the goal each data point is.

Lines can also show the percentage achieved toward completion or highlight the amount left to go.

5. Explode data.

Some data has important subcategories. To break out deeper segmentation within a particular data point, “explode” its details into an attached, secondary chart. In that new chart, you can highlight the key subunits in different colors.

Clarity Communicates What’s Important

When it comes to sharing key data insights, what you see is what you get.

The simplest visual way to ensure that audiences don’t miss the points you’re trying to convey is to clearly annotate your charts and graphs. Putting the extra effort into making your data’s insights easy to consume — by adding color, math, or bubbles with additional data — demonstrates empathy for your audience. It’s one of many ways to use your data to tell a story. If your data is easier to follow, your audience won’t get lost, won’t get bored, and will see the meaning of your charts more clearly.

(See 23 examples, including before-and-after makeovers, in the downloadable PDF “Five Annotation Strategies That Will Make Your Charts Stand Out.”)

Addressing Racism, Word by Word

To achieve progress in addressing racism, businesses must move beyond arguments about semantics.

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As protests against racism have filled streets across the country this year, I’ve been hearing from businesses looking for ways to navigate these controversial times. They generally have good intentions. But all too often, their efforts to take action devolve into petty battles over language.

The terms unconscious bias, white privilege, and even Black Lives Matter can trigger emotional, defensive responses — something I see frequently in deeply conservative parts of Texas where I consult with companies. It becomes a trap.

Even the term racism stymies some organizations. Many people have been taught that all racists wear hoods or swastikas; they’re toxic, violent, terrible people. So, many instinctively reject the idea that they, and good people they know, may be part of a racist culture. We want a language that “others” racism to those horrible people over there, but never ourselves.

People also recoil against the concept of systemic racism. If they’ve had success within the system, they feel this term diminishes their own hard work and skills. People similarly resist language that limits their behavior or calls for significant change. Whether it is “defund the police” or calling someone a “Karen,” we spend more time battling the labels themselves than the concepts that drive them.

Part of the problem lies in language itself. In sessions I lead for businesses, I often discuss how people who live in certain icy parts of the world have dozens of words for snow and ice because their survival depends on it. When something plays a major role in your life, you recognize the many different forms it can come in. In American culture, we use the same word, racism, for a Ku Klux Klan member burning a cross on a lawn and a teacher discouraging Black children from applying to the best schools because she assumes they won’t get in. Both are racist, and both need to be addressed, but they’re not the same. Treating them as such makes it nearly impossible to address them successfully.

Even the terms diversity and inclusion can mean different things to different people. As a result, many businesses spend more time arguing about semantics than getting things done. Three key steps can help companies solve this problem.

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¿CÓMO ERES? – Psicología de los 5 GRANDES RASGOS de la PERSONALIDAD (Lewis Goldberg)

¿CÓMO ERES? - Psicología de los 5 GRANDES RASGOS de la PERSONALIDAD (Lewis Goldberg)

El modelo de los cinco grandes rasgos de la personalidad (también denominado Big Five) fue diseñado por Lewis Goldberg en colaboración con varios psicólogos expertos en materia. Estos atributos forman el acrónimo OCEAN (Apertura, Responsabilidad, Extraversión, Amabilidad y Neuroticismo). ¿Cuál es la diferencia entre personalidad, temperamento y carácter? Y más importante aún, ¿cómo eres en realidad? Descubre lo increíblemente compleja que es la personalidad humana.
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Decía Tales de Mileto: “lo fácil es pensar que conocemos al prójimo; lo difícil, conocerse a uno mismo”. Si me preguntan a mí, al matemático griego no le falta ni un ápice de razón en dichas declaraciones. Parece que somos expertos en juzgar, etiquetar y desprestigiar a los demás en base al comportamiento que adoptan para con las personas de su alrededor;
de puertas para fuera, la personalidad ajena es llana, simple, predecible y descifrable. Sin embargo, ¿qué sucede cuando toca analizarnos a nosotros mismos? De repente, emergen de una selva fragosa y profunda complejísimos pensamientos, sentimientos y alegorías de todo tipo que tienen por objeto representar nuestra identidad. A la postre, tendemos a concebirnos como la excepción a la norma, el intruso en la sala, el punto aislado del plano que corrompe, deprava y ensucia por entero el análisis de regresión. “Yo soy, como diría Ortega y Gasset, yo y mis circunstancias… ¿De verdad la gente cree que puede etiquetar mi forma de ser y pronosticar mi conducta?” – dijo un hombre cualquiera.

No me cabe la menor duda de que personalidad es uno de los puzles psicológicos más enrevesados y caóticos que podemos encontrar, pues existen infinitas combinaciones de seres humanos, cada cual singular e irrepetible. Aun así, también impera la tendencia a polarizar nuestras
valoraciones hacia un status-quo exageradamente positivo (ignorando los vicios, defectos y manías más notorios en los que solemos incurrir en pos de enaltecer nuestra imagen de cara al público) o dramáticamente negativo (creando una visión distorsionada y pesimista de nuestros atributos, capacidades y facultades y, en suma, magnificando las emociones adversas que retroalimentan dichos pensamientos catastrofistas). El psicólogo estadounidense Lewis Goldberg diseñó el prestigioso modelo de los cinco grandes (o, simplemente, Big Five): una clasificación o taxonomía de rasgos de personalidad que analiza en profundidad la composición de cinco de sus dimensiones en su sentido más amplio, cumpliendo de este modo con la condición previa. Los cinco elementos principales forman el acrónimo OCEAN:
Factor O: Openness o apertura.
Factor C: Conscientiousness o responsabilidad.
Factor E: Extraversion o extraversión.
Factor A: Agreeableness o amabilidad.
Factor N: Neuroticism o inestabilidad emocional.

La mayor miedo es la pandamia | Samar Yorde | TEDxCascoViejo

La mayor miedo es la pandamia | Samar Yorde | TEDxCascoViejo

La gran enfermedad del 2020 es el miedo.

COVID19 nos ha dado una lección de humildad y una oportunidad para comenzar de nuevo. Un buen día descubrimos que un pequeño virus logró poner en jaque la salud, la seguridad y la economía del mundo entero.

Y nos agarró distraídos, desprevenidos y arrogantes. Confiados en la tecnología y en la globalización. De golpe comprendimos que no tenemos control de las fuerzas del mundo y que todo puede cambiar de un día para otro.

Ahora, nos damos cuenta que lo único que realmente podemos controlar es lo que pensamos, comemos y hacemos cada día con nuestras vidas.

Como médico e investigadora de la salud y el rejuvenecimiento natural, en esta charla aportamos las claves más inteligentes para rescatar a la gente paralizada por el miedo a la enfermedad y sus consecuencias económicas.

Nacimos para vivir con salud y bienestar. La inteligencia natural que nos dio la vida puede regenerar nuestras células y mantener nuestro cuerpo en armonía. La buena noticia es que podemos activar esa inteligencia, tomando las decisiones correctas.

¿Qué vas a hacer por tu vida en esta nueva realidad? Samar es médico de profesión, con maestría en salud pública y certificación Universitaria en Medicina de Obesidad. Además está certificada como Coach de salud en los Estados Unidos.

Ha sido autora de tres libros de salud, bienestar y cocina saludable y es experta en temas de rejuvenecimiento natural, felicidad y longevidad.

Se desempeña como conferencista y creadora de contenido digital para la plataforma de redes sociales Soy Saludable, fundada hace más de 11 años, presente en instagram, facebook, twitter y youtube con una comunidad cercana a las 2 millones de hispanos.

Hoy en día viene a hablarnos de la enfermedad más poderosa del 2020: EL MIEDO. Con un análisis simple y una estrategia infalible para liberarnos de la parálisis y sus graves consecuencias para nuestras vidas. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

Il mondo ha bisogno di management pubblico | Angelo Tenese | TEDxModena

Il mondo ha bisogno di management pubblico | Angelo Tenese | TEDxModena

Direttore Generale della ASL Roma 1, un’azienda pubblica che si rivolge ad oltre un
milione di abitanti con circa 7.500 operatori e un bilancio annuo di quasi tre miliardi di
euro. Ha maturato una specifica competenza ed esperienza nel management pubblico,
dirigendo importanti processi di riorganizzazione e fusione di aziende pubbliche, con un
forte orientamento all’innovazione e alla gestione del cambiamento. Laureato in Economia
Aziendale presso l’Università Bocconi di Milano, con specializzazione presso
l’Institut d’Etudes Politiques (Sciences Po) di Parigi. Ha lavorato come esperto in
programmi e progetti nazionali del Dipartimento della Funzione Pubblica. Collabora con
diverse Università come docente di organizzazione e management pubblico, temi sui
quali ha numerose pubblicazioni, tra cui il recente volume “Il ruolo del management nel
Servizio Sanitario: Una storia in tre atti”, Egea Editore. Direttore Generale della ASL Roma 1, un’azienda pubblica che si rivolge ad oltre un
milione di abitanti con circa 7.500 operatori e un bilancio annuo di quasi tre miliardi di
euro. Ha maturato una specifica competenza ed esperienza nel management pubblico,
dirigendo importanti processi di riorganizzazione e fusione di aziende pubbliche, con un
forte orientamento all’innovazione e alla gestione del cambiamento. Laureato in Economia
Aziendale presso l’Università Bocconi di Milano, con specializzazione presso
l’Institut d’Etudes Politiques (Sciences Po) di Parigi. Ha lavorato come esperto in
programmi e progetti nazionali del Dipartimento della Funzione Pubblica. Collabora con
diverse Università come docente di organizzazione e management pubblico, temi sui
quali ha numerose pubblicazioni, tra cui il recente volume “Il ruolo del management nel
Servizio Sanitario: Una storia in tre atti”, Egea Editore. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx